And Dangerous to Know

And Dangerous to Know

When the ladies of the ton of Regency London need discreet assistance, they turn to Rosalind Thorne—in these mysteries inspired by the novels of Jane Austen . . . Trust is a delicate thing, and no one knows that better than Rosalind Thorne. Lady Melbourne has entrusted her with recovering a packet of highly sensitive private letters stolen from her desk. The contents of...

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Title:And Dangerous to Know
Author:Darcie Wilde
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And Dangerous to Know Reviews

  • QNPoohBear

    When the body of an unidentified woman is brought to Bow Street, Principal Officer Adam Harkness is concerned because the woman was found in the courtyard of Melbourne House. Lady Melbourne is one of the highest sticklers of the ton and will not take kindly to Bow Street asking questions. Thankfully, Adam knows the one person who can ask important questions to find out the woman's identity and who killed her. Little does Adam know, Rosalind Thorne has just accepted a position at Melbourne House

    When the body of an unidentified woman is brought to Bow Street, Principal Officer Adam Harkness is concerned because the woman was found in the courtyard of Melbourne House. Lady Melbourne is one of the highest sticklers of the ton and will not take kindly to Bow Street asking questions. Thankfully, Adam knows the one person who can ask important questions to find out the woman's identity and who killed her. Little does Adam know, Rosalind Thorne has just accepted a position at Melbourne House to help Lady Melbourne find a packet of missing letters. The letters belong to the notorious Lord Byron, now living in exile, and would cause a huge scandal if made public, which is what Lady Melbourne fears. Lady Melbourne's "mad" daughter-in-law, Lady Caroline, had a passionate affair with Byron that ended badly and caused a scandal. Lady Melbourne would do anything to protect her family and her son's political ambitions. He claims his wife doesn't have the letters and Lady Melbourne believes him. Rosalind isn't so sure. She's certain someone or all of them are lying to her. She's wary of Lady Melbourne but determined to find justice for the unfortunate murder victim.

    I am very much impressed with this novel. This series keeps getting better and better. The Regency setting felt very realistic and the murder made sense given the context of the time. There's a little bit of telling and a bit of repetitive dialogue to relay facts. I suppose one could figure out the murder easily enough but I really didn't. I only got it as Rosalind made her conclusion.

    I love how real life people are a major part of the story. They feel very real. Of course I've heard about Caro Lamb, she of the dampened skirts, and the "mad, bad and dangerous to know" Lord Byron. This story put a different spin on Caroline's story, portraying her as an unconventional, misunderstood woman. She may have been mentally ill, she may have been just spoiled but no one can deny she was a good mother to her son Augustus, who had special needs. I found Caroline's relationship to her son in the story very touching and sweet. It's a different relationship than most Regency parents had with their children, especially children that weren't considered normal, like George Austen. Slowly I found Caroline to be a likable, flesh and blood woman instead of the crazy, wild woman she's normally made out to be. She becomes one of many women who didn't conform to society's expectations in this story and that makes the story very sad. There are a couple of minor inaccuracies in language usage but only minor.

    Lady Melbourne is a super high stickler. She can make or break a woman's reputation and she isn't afraid to manipulate people to get what she wants. Lady Melbourne is ruthless and should be a politician herself. Her son William creeps me out a bit. Far from the fatherly Lord Melbourne in

    he is younger here and protective of his family. He loves his wife and his mother but if he feels someone is a threat, he will take care of it, I'm sure. I did not like how quick he was to accept a skewed version of the truth about Rosalind without checking with his mother or even asking her for an explanation first. He also gave me the creeps towards the end with his frank conversation with Rosalind.

    Claridge, Lady Melbourne's ladies' maid is not happy with her lot in life, her position, the Melbourne House set, etc. etc. She's a complainer and a gossip! Yet I sense she is also fiercely loyal to her employer and would do anything to protect her ladyship. Mrs. Kendricks, Rosalind's housekeeper, has a lot to complain about but doesn't. She's steadfast and true. I really like her common sense, bravery and sense of loyalty. I suspect Mrs. Kendricks would like Claridge to be the killer. I would too. Her testimony about what happened when and where seems a bit off. She either knows more or less than she lets on.

    Lord Byron has sent his friend Mr. Scrope Berdmore Davies to retrieve the letters from Lady Melbourne. Rosalind doesn't trust Mr. Davies. Davies, a dandy and known gambler, may already have the letters or may want the letters to extort money from Lady Melbourne. He isn't pleasant to deal with and I don't much like him but I do admire him for being a true friend to Byron. Davies is an annoyance but Fullerton is a real menace. He has a grudge against Rosalind for thwarting his blackmail scheme yet he isn't done lying and manipulating. I can see him being a ruthless killer. Dr. Bellingham is a minor, forgotten character. I don't have much faith in doctors of this period and Bellingham seems like a pompous fool and a wannabe social climber. I don't want him treating Lady Caroline! I want to go to Cornwall and get Dr. Enys to see her instead. Bellingham's treatments seem to make Caroline worse instead of better.

    Dr. Bellingham was able to identify the victim as a Mrs. Judith Oslander, a nurse who sometimes worked with him. To Caroline, Mrs. Oslander was an evil woman, forcing medicine down Caroline's throat acting menacing and mean. To others, Mrs. Oslander provided comfort and peace of mind. She was neat, clean, efficient and really didn't deserve to die. She is an example of yet another woman who refused to behave and paid a terrible price.

    Rosalind has come a long way in a short time. She's very mature and level-headed because she's had to be. She's also compassionate and caring. I like how she handles Lady Melbourne with firmness and how she knows how to deal with the pompous Bow Street Runner John Townsend. Rosalind is determined not to be cowed by anyone and to see justice done. I really admire her. I don't like the love triangle but I see where she's coming from. I think she enjoys her independence and probably won't choose Devon. Adam is a much better man yet not of her class. Adam isn't in the story much. He's removed from the case and put on a path to promotion. The fool Townsend can't see where Adam's passion and talent is- for catching thieves. Adam isn't interested in hobnobbing with the royals. Townsend assumes everyone is a social climber like him. Yet I think I can see that a promotion means the social gulf between Adam and Rosalind would shrink a bit! They have chemistry and they care a lot for each other but is it enough for Rosalind to give up everything she's been brought up to want and expect? (Please, yes!) I hope Adam opens up to his friend Gautier. I really like the easy-going French-African man and his relationship with his wife. Rosalind's friend Alice seems to know Rosalind's feelings but doesn't understand why Rosalind doesn't encourage Devon more. As an independent woman, Alice should understand but she doesn't have as much money or social credit as Rosalind and if she doesn't marry well, she could starve. I like her high spirits and determination. She's a good foil for Rosalind, who is very serious.

    I hope there's a fourth book in this series. I am eager to see what problems Rosalind solves next.

  • Sarah

    After her father and sister abandoned the family after he destroyed their finances and after her mother passed a few years ago, Rosalind Thorne has been forced to make her own way living by her own wits as a 'gentlewoman of reduced circumstances.'

    Recruited by Lady Jersey, Rosalind is called to the home of the prestigious Lady Melbourne to recover a bundle of sensitive correspondence that have been stolen from a locked desk drawer. In order to investigate Rosalind will need to stay on in Lady

    After her father and sister abandoned the family after he destroyed their finances and after her mother passed a few years ago, Rosalind Thorne has been forced to make her own way living by her own wits as a 'gentlewoman of reduced circumstances.'

    Recruited by Lady Jersey, Rosalind is called to the home of the prestigious Lady Melbourne to recover a bundle of sensitive correspondence that have been stolen from a locked desk drawer. In order to investigate Rosalind will need to stay on in Lady Melbourne's home posing as her own private secretary. Not only must she identify the thief, she must also track them down and return them to Lady Melbourne before they cause an irrepairable scandal.

    Lady Melbourne is not giving Rosalind all the facts available. When Adam Harkness comes calling with the news of  an unknown woman found dead within the gates of Melbourne House, Rosalind will have to contend with the danger of not only posing as a member of staff in a powerful household and a blackmailer, but of an unknown murderer.

    ____________________________

    is the third book in Darcy Wilde's Rosalind Thorne Mysteries series. Before I get to the actual review, I just want to mention that the covers for the books in this series are gorgeous.

    I don't want to give away anything of the mystery, so I'll try to be vague. I was pretty sure that I knew who the villian was here but a few of the characters and the twisting of the plot left room for more than one red herring in the mix that will have you changing your mind more than once. I love a good mystery that will keep me guessing.

    I adore regency mysteries and I love the historic tone of this series, the research is evident and pulls you in and immerses you in the story. The historical characters, like Lord Byron and Lady Caroline Lamb, are woven into the story so nicely alongside the fictional ones. I found it very interesting that Wilde was able to give such a sense of these historical figures through only snippets of correspondence (which lead us into each chapter) and being talked about by the other characters. For example, we never actually meet Byron in this book, but you feel like you really get a sense of his character.

    A lot of mysteries run the risk of having either no sense of danger or too much to the point that the mystery looses any sense of reality. But this series has a great balance of danger, especially for our main characters.

    I'm not a fan of love triangles, but this one works... mostly because it is barely a love triangle. The men aren't competing to win the affections of one woman here, there just happen to be two men in her life. One that represents her past and another that represents her future. Rosalind and Devon share a history and affection. Adam and Rosalind share attraction and lifestyles. A future with Devon means a return to the life she was raised to and a future with Adam means a life with a man from the world in which she now lives and has built for herself. I certainly know where I stand on this matter and his name is Harkness.

    I love Rosalind's character, she is clever and compassionate and I look forward to seeing what mystery she'll face next.. perhaps at the Casselmaine estate? This book ends with a nice transition to lead us into the next book in the series, which I am very much looking forward to. I recommend this book and the entire series to fans of recency mysteries. If you enjoy the Lady Darby series by Anna Lee Huber, you'll love this series.

    _____

    Many thanks to NetGalley and Kensington Books for sharing an eARC with me of

    by Darcy Wilde. This is my honest review.

  • Debbie

    "And Dangerous to Know" is a mystery set in 1817 in London, England. This is the third book in the series. You don't need to read the previous books to understand this one, and this one didn't spoil the previous mysteries.

    This was a clue-based puzzle mystery. Rosalind, Harkness (and those helping them) asked questions and collected information in their different ways. Rosalind was clever, but the mystery was complex and twisty. Whodunit was guessable but not obvious. The characters were

    "And Dangerous to Know" is a mystery set in 1817 in London, England. This is the third book in the series. You don't need to read the previous books to understand this one, and this one didn't spoil the previous mysteries.

    This was a clue-based puzzle mystery. Rosalind, Harkness (and those helping them) asked questions and collected information in their different ways. Rosalind was clever, but the mystery was complex and twisty. Whodunit was guessable but not obvious. The characters were interesting and reacted realistically to events. The historical details were woven into the story, and the author clearly put research time into getting those details correct.

    There was no sex. There was a minor amount of bad language. Overall, I'd recommend this interesting mystery.

    I received this book as a review copy from the publisher.

  • Megan

    In this third installment in the series Rosalind finds herself being summoned to Melbourne House and tasked with the job of finding missing letters, the contents of which would bring even greater scandal to Lady Melbourne’s household. Rosalind would rather not get involved with the dramas of this notorious family, but also realizes that her financial well-being is dependent on staying in the good graces of the socially powerful. While trying to decide how to proceed, her friend Adam Harkness a

    In this third installment in the series Rosalind finds herself being summoned to Melbourne House and tasked with the job of finding missing letters, the contents of which would bring even greater scandal to Lady Melbourne’s household. Rosalind would rather not get involved with the dramas of this notorious family, but also realizes that her financial well-being is dependent on staying in the good graces of the socially powerful. While trying to decide how to proceed, her friend Adam Harkness a Bow Street officer, requests her assistance in discreetly investigating the murder of a woman whose body was brought to Bow Street from Melbourne House itself. Taking up residence at Melbourne House, Rosalind must sort through the abundance of lies, half-truths and paranoid suspicions coming from the various members of the household.

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I especially enjoyed the weaving of historical characters with a fictional mystery. While it is not completely necessary to read the other books in the series to understand this one, it would be a shame to miss out on the character development and the background of the, for lack of better term, ‘love triangle’ (which, in my opinion, is exceedingly well handled and far more believable than most). Rosalind’s personal life mostly takes a backseat in this book, but it looks like it might get more focus in the next one.

    Content-wise, I would place this at the low end of PG-13. There is some mild language and a fair amount of discussion regarding the scandalous life of Lord Byron and all those connected to him. The only mildly gruesome content is the description of the injuries observed on the murder victim at the very beginning.

    Thank you so much to NetGalley and Kensington Books for providing me with an ARC!

  • Nancy

    Although this is book three in a series, it is my first encounter with the protagonist, Rosalind Thorne.

    I loved everything about her, and about AND DANGEROUS TO KNOW.

    Years and years ago I was an avid reader of Georgette Heyer's Regency Romances---this book had that familiar element of the restricted society, the haughty grand dames, and the bright, aspiring heroine. But, in addition to the romance, we also have a mystery which I found engaging and challenging.

    Ms. Wilde has written an

    Although this is book three in a series, it is my first encounter with the protagonist, Rosalind Thorne.

    I loved everything about her, and about AND DANGEROUS TO KNOW.

    Years and years ago I was an avid reader of Georgette Heyer's Regency Romances---this book had that familiar element of the restricted society, the haughty grand dames, and the bright, aspiring heroine. But, in addition to the romance, we also have a mystery which I found engaging and challenging.

    Ms. Wilde has written an entertaining and engaging book and I enjoyed every minute I spent with it.

  • Toni

    4.25 Stars

    This is the third book in the Rosalind Thorne mystery series by Darcie Wilde.

    You need to go into this book knowing that this piece is set in the early 1800. Back then the speech was more stiff and proper. So, if you are looking for the normal flow you see in regular era books, you aren’t going to find it here. That is due mostly to the Regency setting. If you love a good Jane Austen book, you will definitely love this. But go in aware of the setting in order to get the most out of this

    4.25 Stars

    This is the third book in the Rosalind Thorne mystery series by Darcie Wilde.

    You need to go into this book knowing that this piece is set in the early 1800. Back then the speech was more stiff and proper. So, if you are looking for the normal flow you see in regular era books, you aren’t going to find it here. That is due mostly to the Regency setting. If you love a good Jane Austen book, you will definitely love this. But go in aware of the setting in order to get the most out of this novel.

    I had a bit of trouble getting into the book due to all the properness and the dropping of so many names with Lord and Lady attached to them. My mind started to swim. I am not a normal reader of a Regency era book. If you have a bit of trouble too, I suggest listening to it on audio book. I let my kindle read it to me and found it all made so much more sense.

    The entire concept of the novel is intriguing. You don’t find ladies like Rosalind much in 1800’s era fiction. She is very intuitive and pays attention to her surroundings. She can also make great leaps in logic. And she does this all while muttering to herself reminding herself to be a proper lady in the midst of the mystery and deception. She reminded me a lot of a female Sherlock Holmes.

    I can see how someone could easily get lost in a novel of this era. The setting really overwhelmed me. I always wonder how authors can so get in touch with such a setting and nail it when offering it to the public.

    Great book. I will definitely pick up the previous two books just to see what I have missed. This book may be a bit different than what we are used to in the cozy world but different isn’t always bad. Check this out and test it for yourself. You won’t be disappointed.

    I received this as an ARC (Advanced Reader Copy) in return for an honest review. I thank NetGalley, the publisher and the author for allowing me to read this title.

  • Sarah

    Until a week ago, I had never heard of the author Darcie Wilde. I have since listened to all 3 books in the Rosalind Thorne series, and am eagerly awaiting more books in the series. I recommend this series to readers who enjoy Deanna Raybourn's Veronica Speedwell series or C.S. Harris' Sebastian St. Cyr mysteries.

  • Helen Howerton

    A dead woman has been found at the gates of Melbourne House. Lord and Lady Melbourne are famous, the upper

    of the

    , as it were. And unfortunately their daughter-in-law is infamous, Lady Caroline Lamb, known for her liaison with George Gordon, "the" Lord Byron of romantic lore. The dead woman is unknown, though. There is a possibility she was killed inside the gates of the mansion -- and a great scandal this would definitely be. Since the police are involved, an investigation must be

    A dead woman has been found at the gates of Melbourne House. Lord and Lady Melbourne are famous, the upper

    of the

    , as it were. And unfortunately their daughter-in-law is infamous, Lady Caroline Lamb, known for her liaison with George Gordon, "the" Lord Byron of romantic lore. The dead woman is unknown, though. There is a possibility she was killed inside the gates of the mansion -- and a great scandal this would definitely be. Since the police are involved, an investigation must be undertaken, but with the highest secrecy. Adam Harkness, principal officer at Bow Street Police Station, will see to it.

    While this is happening, another matter has captured the attention of Lady Melbourne. Miss Rosalind Thorne is summoned to the house by Sarah, Lady Jersey, the doyenne of Georgian society. Thus we have the start of

    the third of the historical mystery series set in Georgian times by Darcie Wilde.

    There are letters missing, embarrassing letters. Lady M suspects “they” mean to publish, not blackmail. The scandal would be devastating. She wants Rosalind to stop this from happening. She wants the letters back in any event, whatever the reason for their disappearance. Rosalind agrees to help, moving into the mansion as her ladyship’s new secretary. So she is in place as Mr. Harkness comes on the scene. Both of them will soon have work to do. For the murder and the missing letters must be connected -- mustn’t they?

    There’s mutual attraction here, of course. But convention ensures only readers are aware of it. Besides, Rosalind has a duke that’s offered her marriage. What’s a girl to do? Especially a poor girl. But at least we do learn of one concrete reason who Rosalind can’t marry her duke. I was glad of that.

    Rosalind and her policeman do spend a lot of time in this book “thinking.” It’s a way that the author communicates facts. It’s also a way for the plot to get pushed along, but it does tend to get annoying after a while.

    This is one of those books in which it might help if you know your history, so that you will more completely understand why these people are acting the way they do in these pages. The author does a good job of filling in some of the backstory -- including providing a truly shocking reason for why “the letters” can’t ever see the light of day, something that was hinted about at the time, but it might behoove you to do a little research of your own. The social media darlings of today have nothing on the men and women who flitted through the drawing rooms and ballrooms of British society in the early 19th century.

    Chapters go back and forth between Rosalind and Adam, so that we can see what is happening from the different points of view. It helps to heighten the tension and serves as quite the page-turner. And a page-turner it is, even though the book bogged down a bit for me with the retelling of the travails of Lady Caroline; as far as the murder goes, pretty much everyone is trying to implicate Lady C, including herself. After we get past that little red herring, we get to the meat of the story and the real mystery and the solving of it. It’s quite a tale. Rosalind may come up against some that would like to see her fail, but that’s never an option.

    The books ends on a thoughtful note. Rosalind must make some decisions for herself. She’ll work through them, of course, because there are more stories to tell.

    Thanks to the publisher and to NetGalley for a copy of this book in advance of publication, in exchange for this review.

  • Elaine Wilson

    Very disappointing. I did not appreciate the se of real historic figures as the lead characters. While the author attempted to cast suspicion on the members of the family, anyone knowing the history knew they were not murderers.

    Also, by the third volume it's time to pick the hero.

  • Hannah

    YES! The cover is here! I go back and forth on whether Im rooting for Devon or Adam, but judging by how excited I was that the latter was in the synopsis, I guess Im more into Adam at the moment.

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